Archive for barros

Isabel’s Picks for Winter 2017

LIGHT IS THE SPIRIT

Let it shine through you

VMZinc, Morph Bar stool, Zeitraum, christmas lights, Moroccan, Superfresco Java Wallpaper, brown zinc

 

1. STOOL

Brand: Zeitraum

Designer: Formstelle

Name: Morph Bar stool

Price range: €800

Material: Solid american walnut.

Available to Ireland from:  Made in Design

 

2. ZINC  

Manufacturer: VMZinc

Price range: n/a

Material: Pre weathered zinc – Pigmento Autumn Red.

Applications: Roofing and façade systems.

Available in Ireland from:  Metal Processors Limited

 

3. LIGHTS

Name: Christmas Lights

Price range: €13.87

Bulbs: 20 LEDs

Colour: Warm white.

Available in Ireland from:  HappyNesty

 

4. WALLPAPER

Brand: Graham & Brown

Range: Superfresco

Product name: Superfresco Java Wallpaper – Beige

Price range: €19.99/roll

Available in Ireland from: Littlewoods Ireland

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See Full Gallery of Isabel’s Picks

Before CAD – A Trip to Memory Lane

 

CAD stands for Computer-Aided Design. CAD software has been widely used by Architects to create two-dimensional (2D) drawings or three-dimensional (3D) models.

 

It was in the early 90s when I started using CAD software (possibly AutoCAD R10 !) but things were very different before CAD.

 

The drawings were done by hand using technical pens/Rotring rapidograph pens on tracing paper. Some examples below.

Window detail - note the different line thicknesses, the text and numbers. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Window detail – note the different line thicknesses, the text and numbers.

 

Rotring rapidograph pens with different thicknesses. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Rotring rapidograph pens with different thicknesses

 

Market - Lower Ground Floor Plan, hand drawn. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Market – Lower Ground Floor Plan, hand drawn

 

Different technical pens, note the VERY old ones to the right hand side. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Different technical pens, note the VERY old ones to the right hand side

 

Restaurant - Floor Plan, hand drawn. Note the different symbols (tables, doors, etc). © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Restaurant – Floor Plan, hand drawn. Note the different symbols (tables, doors, etc)

 

Mistakes or changes were painful to correct. The ink had to be rubbed off or scraped with a blade, then the tracing paper to be made smooth again and then new lines could be drawn (if we were lucky enough not to make a hole in the paper!).

Different tools to remove ink from tracing paper. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Different tools to remove ink from tracing paper

 

3D of Science Museum, hand drawn. This sheet was nearly 3 meters long! © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

3D of Science Museum, hand drawn. This sheet was nearly 3 meters long!

 

Urban scheme overlaid to map, hand drawn. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Urban scheme overlaid to map, hand drawn

 

Patterns had to be cut to size from a special pattern sheet.

Patterns had to be cut to size from a special pattern sheet. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

 

Apartment block - Floor Plan, hand drawn. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Apartment block – Floor Plan, hand drawn

 

Letters and numbers were done using template letters rulers like the ones below.

template letters rulers. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Apartment block - 3D, hand drawn. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

 

Curves and symbols were done with template stencils.

Template stencils. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Template stencils

 

© 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Can you imagine how long it took to design 12 storeys with these stairs?

 

The all design process was very time consuming and our necks suffered immensely, but the end result was somehow a  piece of art.

 

What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger,

Isabel
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All images in this post are subject to copyright.

© 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

How Many Churches Are Falling Down?

Churches in Ireland retain a considerable significance, they are often the most prominent buildings in their locality and possess architectural, historical and social significance.

Many churches have become neglected or abandoned. And many have suffered from incorrect repairs that were done most of the times with the best of intentions.

How many churches are falling down we don’t know but we know what can be done to avoid further damage:

  • Do use experts. When it comes to repairing a church building getting the right advice is very important. Churches can be amongst the most complex of historic building types and the nature of their conservation often requires specialist advice. It is a false economy not to get proper advice before carrying out work. Bad repair works can be difficult and expensive to undo and can damage a building in the long-term.
  • Do repair the parts of the building that need it. Remember, an aim of good conservation works is to do as much as necessary, yet as little as possible.
  • Do make sure appropriate materials and repair techniques are used.
  • Do make sure all interventions are reversible and where appropriate visually identifiable.
  • Do identify and understand the reason for failure before undertaking repairs.
  • Don’t over do it. Remember, minimal intervention should be the aim.
  • Do engage tradespeople with skills in traditional building methods or experienced conservation professionals.

 

The primary aim of conservation is to prolong the life of something of value. Churches provide unique evidence of our past, they are witnesses to centuries of worship, architectural skill and community history. Let’s do what we can to avoid seeing churches falling down.

Isabel Barros is a RIAI registered Architect accredited in Conservation at Grade 3, please contact us today if you need assistance with your Church project. We can also help in the procurement of grant funding to assist with repair and/or maintenance works.

 

Recommended reading: Old Buildings: Why Things Go Wrong

 

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