Isabel Barros Architects - Blog

design + energy + excellence

Tag: one off houses (page 1 of 3)

Minimum BER Rating for New Houses Built in 2019

 

We are quickly approaching the introduction of Nearly-Zero Energy Buildings (nZEB) standard and once again we are asked to improve the energy performance of buildings.

 

What is a Nearly-Zero Energy Building (nZEB)?

‘Nearly zero-energy building’ means a building that has a very high energy performance. The nearly zero or very low amount of energy required should be covered to a very significant extent by energy from renewable sources, including energy from renewable sources produced on-site or nearby.

When will the new regulations be introduced?

Article 9(1) of Directive 2010/31/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 19 May 2010 on the energy performance of buildings requires that all new buildings:

– shall be nearly-zero energy buildings by 31 December 2020;

– occupied and owned by public authorities shall be nearly zero energy buildings after 31 December 2018

A full review of Part L of the Building Regulations is expected to be published very soon, this will include the nZEB standard.

What are the transitional arrangements?

This will be confirmed when the reviewed Part L of the Building Regulations is published.

The draft transitional arrangements required the standard to apply to all new dwellings commencing construction from 1st April 2019 (subject to transition).

Transitional arrangements (draft) will allow Part L-2011 Dwellings to be used when planning permission has been applied for prior to the application date of 1st April 2019 and substantial work * is completed by 31st March 2020.

*The structure of the external walls has been erected.

 

How will compliance with nZEB be demonstrated?

For domestic buildings, compliance will be demonstrated using the DEAP methodology. DEAP is currently being updated to account for NZEB.

For non-domestic buildings, compliance will be demonstrated using the NEAP methodology.

 

Is nZEB standard only for new houses?

No, the new standard applies to Domestic and Non Domestic Buildings.

It also applies to existing buildings (Domestic and Non Domestic) where major renovations take place.

Major Renovation’ means the renovation of a building where more than 25% of the surface area of the building envelope undergoes renovation.

For Existing Non Domestic Buildings this will require that the building is brought up to cost optimal level, which is defined in the building regulations as:

  • Upgrade Heating System more than 15 years’ old
  • Upgrade Cooling and Ventilation Systems more than 15 years’ old
  • Upgrade Lighting more than 15 years old.

For Existing Domestic Buildings, it is proposed that major renovation is typically activated where external wall is renovated. The cost optimal level is a primary energy performance of 125 kWh/m2/yr when calculated using DEAP or upgrade of roof insulation and heating system.

 

What are the BER requirements once nZEB standards are implemented?

This is currently out for public consultation, refer to Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government website for proposed changes to the regulations and DEAP methodology.

For all new builds, it is proposed that nZEB will be equivalent to a 25% improvement in energy performance on the 2011 Building Regulations.

This equates to an energy performance and carbon performance parameter that is 70% better than Ireland’s 2005 standard.

A new Nearly-Zero Energy Building (Dwelling) will typically correspond to an A2 Building Energy Rating (BER).

 

 

Will a new house be more expensive to build from 1st April 2019?

The impact on design and cost is expected to be relatively small.

The projected increase is 1.9% over current construction costs depending on the dwelling archetype and design specification applied.

 

 

Clonmore House – Wexford

 

One thing we can take it from granted when we visit a rural site in Ireland – green pastures!

On our first visit to this site we were greeted by our young clients and Bel, the sheep.

It was easy to get lost in the stunning open views of the hills but Bel reminded us this was a working farm.

 

 

This site in North Wexford has a gentle south-facing slope and it offers the ideal location for our farmer client to build his future family home.

 

 

Re-inventing the traditional farmyard layout

The proposal was strongly inspired by the rural location, the farm environment and the close proximity to existing farm buildings. The traditional farmyard layout (see no. 1 below) was the starting point for the new scheme.

 

The existing site contours are used as the regulating lines for the new layout. They shift the smaller volume until it is stopped by the 2 storey volume (see no. 2 above). The result is a layout that easily meets the current lifestyle of its occupants while reflecting cultural values of the traditional farmyard layout.

 

 

The main living spaces open up to south to enjoy the best views and passive solar gains. The windows frame the views to the surrounding farmlands and hills. The bedrooms face east to enjoy the morning light. The living room connects to an outside space that is sheltered from the weather and can be used all year around.

 

 

A palette of natural and man-made materials is proposed. Stone walls feature throughout the house recalling the character of agricultural buildings. The zinc has a strong agricultural feel that  balances the composition whilst connecting the traditional gabled volumes. This is contrasted with the stone and white render which act as contemporary, yet rural materials.

The layout optimises the use of solar energy and aims to achieve an A3 BER rating (50 kWh/m2/yr).







See more animations here.

Do you have a similar project? Talk to us today!

New Farm House in Oylegate, Wexford

Located in the heart of County Wexford in Ireland, the site enjoys beautiful landscape views. The client’s brief sought a simple residence with lots of natural light and a good connection with the landscape. The farm complex is quite dominant and sits interestingly on a different direction than the original farm house.

 

Our proposal was carefully designed to respect the site history while introducing a more contemporary volume.

14.84_Main Concept

The two main directions on site are the starting point for our proposal. The memory of the old house being replaced remains present. This volume is intersected by a lower, more contemporary, volume.

The new house respects the immediate surroundings either by the materials selected or the shapes and scale used.

The fenestration to North is reduced to the minimum to improve energy efficiency. The living spaces of the house are located to South enjoying most of the solar gains while creating a strong connection to outside.

Being aware of its rural location, the house is conceived as two simple volumes that mark each other by carving out a new relationship. The openings are treated as clean incisions that provide optimum views of the surrounding landscape.

14.84_04 14.84_0514.84_0714.84_09

 

Isabel_Barros_(@Barros_Isabel)_Twitter_-_2014-10-16_14.35.33

See more animations here.

 

Do you have a similar project? Talk to us today!

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