Archive for Architecture

Before CAD – A Trip to Memory Lane

 

CAD stands for Computer-Aided Design. CAD software has been widely used by Architects to create two-dimensional (2D) drawings or three-dimensional (3D) models.

 

It was in the early 90s when I started using CAD software (possibly AutoCAD R10 !) but things were very different before CAD.

 

The drawings were done by hand using technical pens/Rotring rapidograph pens on tracing paper. Some examples below.

Window detail - note the different line thicknesses, the text and numbers. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Window detail – note the different line thicknesses, the text and numbers.

 

Rotring rapidograph pens with different thicknesses. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Rotring rapidograph pens with different thicknesses

 

Market - Lower Ground Floor Plan, hand drawn. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Market – Lower Ground Floor Plan, hand drawn

 

Different technical pens, note the VERY old ones to the right hand side. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Different technical pens, note the VERY old ones to the right hand side

 

Restaurant - Floor Plan, hand drawn. Note the different symbols (tables, doors, etc). © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Restaurant – Floor Plan, hand drawn. Note the different symbols (tables, doors, etc)

 

Mistakes or changes were painful to correct. The ink had to be rubbed off or scraped with a blade, then the tracing paper to be made smooth again and then new lines could be drawn (if we were lucky enough not to make a hole in the paper!).

Different tools to remove ink from tracing paper. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Different tools to remove ink from tracing paper

 

3D of Science Museum, hand drawn. This sheet was nearly 3 meters long! © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

3D of Science Museum, hand drawn. This sheet was nearly 3 meters long!

 

Urban scheme overlaid to map, hand drawn. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Urban scheme overlaid to map, hand drawn

 

Patterns had to be cut to size from a special pattern sheet.

Patterns had to be cut to size from a special pattern sheet. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

 

Apartment block - Floor Plan, hand drawn. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Apartment block – Floor Plan, hand drawn

 

Letters and numbers were done using template letters rulers like the ones below.

template letters rulers. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Apartment block - 3D, hand drawn. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

 

Curves and symbols were done with template stencils.

Template stencils. © 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Template stencils

 

© 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Can you imagine how long it took to design 12 storeys with these stairs?

 

The all design process was very time consuming and our necks suffered immensely, but the end result was somehow a  piece of art.

 

What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger,

Isabel
_____________

All images in this post are subject to copyright.

© 2017 Isabel Barros Architects

Re-Use and Re-Adaptation of Churches – 3 Irish Examples

 

These Irish examples offer a positive approach for re-imagining historic buildings while following best conservation practices.

Introducing change into the historic built environment requires sensitivity and high standards of design. Often it is necessary to find an appropriate use in order to prevent a building’s decay or destruction, this being one of the hardest problems to solve in the practice of architectural conservation.

The creative challenge is to find appropriate ways to satisfy the requirements of a structure to be safe, durable and useful on the one hand, and to retain its character and special interest on the other.

Rehabilitation has social, cultural and economic advantages. Social, in that people and towns keep their identity; cultural, in that artistic, architectural, archaeological and documentary values can be preserved both for their intrinsic value and their contribution to the identity of the town; economic, in that (a) existing capital is used, (b) energy is saved, (c) demolition costs are avoided, and (d) the existing infrastructure of roads and services is utilized. (B. Feilden, 2003)

 

The following are good examples of adaptive reuse in Ireland.

 

St. Mary’s Abbey, Kilkenny

Conversion to Museum – McCullough Mulvin Architects

 

 

St. Luke’s Church, Dublin

Conversion to Offices (on site Oct. 2017) – DTA Architects & Carrig Conservation Consultants

Existing Section

Proposed Section

 

 

 

 

St. Jame’s Church, Dublin / Pearse Lyons Distillery

Conversion to Distillery – TOTP Architects & Carrig Conservation Consultants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 15,000 Tile Building

 

 

Covering external walls with ceramic tiles is a Portuguese tradition with at least 500 years. The new MAAT (Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology) in Lisbon took this tradition one step further and used 15,000 3D wall tiles to cover its walls.

 

 

Traditional Portuguese tiles ('azulejos')

Traditional Portuguese tiles

 

The MAAT tiles were manufactured in Barcelona by the same company that worked with Antoni Gaudí, and it’s still working in ‘La Sagrada Família’.

Wall tiles, MAAT Lisbon

Wall tiles, MAAT Lisbon

 

The 60cm high tiles are hollow to reduce the weight. The architect says they will (intentionally) start cracking very soon.

 

Some interesting facts about MAAT:

  • 15,000 hexagonal wall tiles cover the building.
  • The tiles are mechanically fixed.
  • Designed by Amanda Levete Architects by direct invitation.
  • The Museum Director is an Architect – Pedro Gadanho (former MoMA curator).
  • 420 m2 of minimal frame windows – PanoramAH system.
  • The central gallery has an oval shape and it is below the river level.
  • Construction cost: €20 million.
  • Construction cost per m²: €2,702. (Gross internal floor area 7,400m²).
  • It is possible to walk over the roof.
  • Owned by the Portuguese electricity and gas provider EDP.

15,000 wall tiles cover the MAAT’s walls

 

It is possible to walk over the MAAT’s roof.

 

 

Visit MAAT’s website here.

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