Archive for Construction

3 Things You Didn’t Know Architects Do #2

 

From the Employer’s initial brief through to project completion the Architect undertakes a myriad of processes.

Many of the conditions in standard forms of building contract relate to financial matters, and Architects need to have a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of them and be able to apply those conditions properly and in a professional manner.

Contract administration can be quite complex and this (short) post by no means explores all that is involved. We just want to highlight 3 things you (probably) didn’t know architects do when they are appointed for the Construction Stage of your project:

1. Prepare the Building Contract

2. Issue Certificates for Payment to the Contractor

Certification and making decisions are important duties for the Contract Administrator (the Architect). Certification requires the Architect to exercise judgement on various matters arising from the performance of the contract. The Architect has to issue interim certificates stating the amount due to the contractor. This amount shall be the total value of the work duly executed and of materials and goods delivered to site, less an amount to be retained by the Employer. The certificate must be factual and accurate, as the Architect may be personally liable for errors in certification.

The Architect/Contract Administrator typically sends the Certificate to the Contractor. After this the Contractor is entitled to send his invoice together with the Certificate to the Employer. The Employer shall honour the Certificate within 7 working days of the certificate.

3. Issue Instructions to the Contractor

 

3 Things You Didn’t Know Architects Do

 

We often feel that most people think that Architects are a bunch of creative minds that can “draw some plans” for you. Well, we do much MUCH more than that, particularly if we are appointed for all stages of your project.

Even though our services are all detailed in our agreements we feel that most of our clients do not know what exactly they involve until they actually get to that stage of the works.

Contract administration can be quite complex and this (short) post by no means explores all that is involved. We just want to highlight 3 things you (probably) didn’t know architects do when they are appointed for the Construction Stage of your project:

1. Prepare the Building Contract

This starts by selecting the appropriate type of RIAI contract for the works. There are a number of different contracts available, they also have attached a long list of conditions which the Architect should be familiar with.

The Architect then prepares the contract (by filling in all the relevant sections) and arranges for it to be signed by the Contractor (the builder) and by the Employer (the Architect’s client).

In simple terms, the Building Contract states that the Contractor is obliged to construct the Works in accordance with the drawings, specifications, etc which define the works, for the agreed Contract sum and be finished by the agreed completion date. The Employer’s principal obligation is to pay for work done.

The Building Contract has a number of conditions/clauses, these prescribe and allocate important rights, duties and liabilities. These conditions are very useful to resolve problems that can occur in a typical construction project.

2. Issue Certificates for Payment to the Contractor

3. Issue Instructions to the Contractor

 

 

 

Building Costs in Ireland 2016

Every year we share useful information to guide you on the costs for your construction project in Ireland. This article will help you to estimate an approximate figure for your building costs.

You can read our other articles in this series here.

Following the difficult years of the global financial crisis Ireland is now the fastest-growing economy in the EU. Overall construction output in 2016 is expected to improve by 2.6%.

Demand for construction activity continues to rise but the industry will continue to face resourcing challenges to meet demand.

 

Average Irish Construction Prices 2016

The average construction costs table is generated using Bruce Shaw’s Cost Database and sets out typical building construction costs. Bruce Shaw’s database is the largest construction cost database in Ireland.

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Bruce Shaw Construction Prices 2016_1

Bruce Shaw Construction Prices 2016_2

Average Irish Construction Costs 2016. Source: Bruce Shaw

Bruce Shaw Construction Prices 2016_notes

 

Turner & Townsend‘s annual construction cost survey provides a comprehensive and detailed overview of construction costs in Ireland, in 2016.

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Turnerandtownsend1

International building costs per m2 of internal area, in 2016

International building costs per m2 of internal area, in 2016. Source: Turner & Townsend

 

Labour rates and Construction Materials Prices

Turner & Townsend‘s annual construction cost survey provides labour costs and also the prices for some materials. Their cost escalation forecast for 2016-2017 is 6%.

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Turnerandtownsend_Material and labour 2016

Labour and Materials Prices, 2016. Source: Turner & Townsend

 

 

The latest monthly data from CSO recorded that all materials prices increased by 1.1% in the year since July 2015.

The most notable yearly changes were increases in Sand and gravel (+11.0%), Stone (+8.3%) and Fabricated metal (+7.4%), while there were decreases in Copper pipes and fittings (-4.2%), Glass (-4.1%) and Ready mixed mortar and concrete (-2.0%).

 

Guide to Rebuilding Costs in Ireland

The Society of Chartered Surveyors publishes every year a guide to rebuilding costs in Ireland. This guide is intended to assist in insuring a house and the costs included are based on building rates as of June 2016.

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SCSI Rebuilding Costs 2016

Table of Rebuilding Costs June 2016. Source: Society of Chartered Surveyors.

SCSI Rebuilding Costs 2016_notes

 

SCSI also provides a House Rebuilding Cost Calculator here. This calculator can be used as a guide to give you a minimum base cost for your construction project.

 

Typical Exclusions

There are a number of other expenses that you should also consider when estimating your project. See some of the exclusions that may apply to your project here.

Architect’s fees will vary based on a number of factors ranging from size and complexity to level of the service required. These two articles provide some guidelines:

Additionally, you may also need to allow for:

  • Design Certifier Fees
  • Assigned Certifier fees

 

Check out our other articles in this series

 

 

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