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Category: Construction (page 1 of 12)

Overview of Key Changes to TGD L – Dwellings 2019


Technical Guidance Documents are published to accompany each part of the Building Regulations in Ireland indicating how the requirements of that part can be achieved in practice.

Technical Guidance Document L (TGD L) indicates the requirements for Conservation of Fuel and Energy.

A new TGD L is due to be published in 2019. The new document follows a revision of the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD). Member States have until March 2020 to translate into national law all the new requirements from the EU energy efficiency legislation affecting buildings.

Draft Transitional Arrangements:

  • NZEB and TGD L 2019 Dwellings to apply to new Dwellings commencing construction from 1st November 2019 subject to transition.
  • Transitional arrangements to allow TGD L 2011 – Dwellings to be used where planning approval or permission has been applied for on or before 31st October 2019 and substantial completion is completed within 1 year i.e. by 31st October 2020.

Overview of key changes to TGD L Dwellings 2019:

  • Introduction of NZEB (Nearly-Zero Energy Building), MPEPC (Maximum Permitted Energy Performance Coefficient)=0.30, MPCPC (Maximum Permitted Carbon Performance Coefficient)=0.35
  • Introduction of Major Renovations to a cost optimal level where technically, economically and functionally feasible
  • Introduction of a Renewable Energy Ratio (RER) of 20% as per ISO EN 52000 (to replace 10kWh/m2 /yr).
  • Reduction of air permeability backstop from 7m3 /hr/m2 to 5m3 /hr/m2
  • Table 1- Reduction of wall and floor backstop U-Value from 0.21W/m2K to 0.18 W/m2K
  • Table 1- Reduction of window backstop U-Value from 1.6 W/m2K to 1.4 W/m2K
  • Inclusion of guidance to avoid overheating in dwellings
  • Par 1.3.2.5 – removal of variation of U-Value with percentage glazing • Introduction of calculation of Ru value for corridors in apartments.

The draft TGD L – Dwellings 2019 can be accessed here.

The current TGD L – Dwellings 2011-2017 can be accessed here.

Minimum BER rating for new houses built in 2019.

Building Costs in Ireland 2018

 

Every year we share useful information to guide you on the costs for your construction project in Ireland. This will help you to estimate an approximate figure for your building costs.

You can check our other articles in this series here.

Tender prices are still increasing in 2018, with construction inflation levels running well ahead of general inflation. This is fuelled by increasing demand, skills shortages, pressure on wage rates, increases in material prices and regulatory changes.

Linesight’s research shows that, on average, tender prices rose by approximately 7.5% during 2017 while construction input costs rose on average by 3%. Due to high ongoing demand this level of increase is likely to continue for the foreseeable future.

During 2018 Linesight  predicts that tender prices will increase by 7% on average.

The increase in tender prices, which we expect to continue, emphasises the importance of budgeting for future construction inflation in feasibility studies and cost plans.

 

Average Irish Construction Prices 2018

The average construction costs table is generated using Linesight’s Cost Database and sets out typical building construction costs.

(Click image to enlarge)

Average Irish Construction Costs 2018. Source: Linesight

 

Turner & Townsend‘s annual construction cost survey also provides an overview of construction costs in Ireland.

(Click image to enlarge)

International building costs per m2 of internal area, in 2018. Source: Turner & Townsend

 

 

Labour rates and Construction Materials Prices

Turner & Townsend‘s annual construction cost survey provides labour costs and also the prices for some materials. Their cost escalation forecast for 2018-2019 is 7%.

(Click image to enlarge)

Labour and Materials Prices, 2018. Source: Turner & Townsend

 

Construction wage rates, 2018. Source: Turner & Townsend

 

 

 

The latest monthly data from CSO recorded that building and construction materials prices showed an increase of 0.7% in June 2018, compared to a decrease of 7.5% in the year to July 2018. (Price Index June 2018: 105.5; Price Index June 2017: 114.1)

The most notable yearly changes were increases in Bituminous emulsions (+10.2%), Plaster (+6.9%) and Paints, oils and varnishes (+7.5%) while there were decreases in Sand and gravel (-17.9%), ready mixed mortar and concrete (-1.9%) and Concrete blocks and bricks (-1.5%).

 

Build Cost Calculator 

Selfbuild magazine has partnered up with ProntoCalc to provide the FREE Selfbuild Build Cost Calculator. You can try it here.

Selfbuild Build Cost Calculator

 

 

Typical Exclusions

There are a number of other expenses that you should also consider when estimating your project. See some of the exclusions that may apply to your project here.

Architect’s fees will vary based on a number of factors ranging from size and complexity to level of the service required. These two articles provide some guidelines:

Additionally, you may also need to allow for:

  • Design Certifier Fees
  • Assigned Certifier fees

 

 

Check out our other articles in this series

 

 

Advantages and Disadvantages of Timber Frame Construction

 

Advantages of Timber Frame Construction

 

  • Recyclable
  • Renewable

Timber is classified as a renewable material, as the principle holds that if a tree is felled another is planted in its place. As long as this balance is maintained, the supply will be sustainable.

  • Low embodied energy if constructed in local timber
  • Reduced construction waste through efficient controlled manufacturing
  • Low volume of waste on site requiring removal
  • Quick build time

A prefabricated timber frame can be erected on site faster than a comparable brick and block construction. However, timber frames may require additional time for their design and fabrication, which can lead to a longer wait before work begins on site. 

  • Reduced site labour
  • Reduced time to weather the structure
  • Earlier introduction of following trades

The quicker erection time enables interior trades such as plastering and electrical wiring to begin work earlier in the build programme, as the interior will be exposed to weather for less time.

  • Can be built to exceed 60-year design life
  • Energy efficient when constructed to current standards
  • Fast heating due to low thermal mass

Their low thermal mass allows spaces enclosed by timber frames to heat up more quickly than masonry construction, however they will also tend to cool more quickly.

  • Reduced time on site reduces environmental nuisance and disruption to local residents
  • Engineered product
  • Factory controlled quality assurance in fabrication

Off site fabrication can allow higher quality to be achieved.

  • Efficient use of material due to controlled engineering and fabrication
  • Reduced construction time translates into reduced risk exposure

 

Potential Problems with Timber Frame Construction

 

  • Traditional procurement process
  • Additional design and engineering time
  • Modification of general arrangement drawings if based on masonry construction
  • Lack of experienced builders and erection crews
  • Lack of experience of following trades
  • Transportation and carriage access
  • Exposure to weather before enclosed
  • Work of following trades
  • Deficiency of site quality control
  • Combustibility of timber requires vigilant quality control to achieve required fire rating of separating and compartment walls

The fire resistance of timber frame buildings is achieved by a combination of the lining material, the timber structure and the insulation.

Additional fire protection can be given to the frame by the boarding used to clad it and fire stops installed to prevent spread through the cavity.

Recent fire tests commissioned by the Timber Frame Industry and the ITFMA showed that in general a 15mm Type A plasterboard is required to meet the Fire resistance of REI 30 for external walls (see detail).

The risk of fire can be increased if timber frames are not erected correctly, and during construction prior to fire protection being installed.

  • Susceptibility to decay of timber when exposed to excessive moisture

Timber frame structures must include a vapour barrier between the lining of the inner wall and the insulation, to prevent vapour passing through.

  • Acoustics

Timber frame structures may not achieve the same level of sound insulation as concrete or masonry as they are not as dense.

 

Timber Frame – Wall Detail (Service Cavity Wall)



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