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Category: Construction (Page 1 of 13)

Irish Construction Costs in 2020

COVID-19 has had a significant effect on the outlook for the Irish construction industry which has been experiencing reduced productivity, increased lead times and considerable disruptions to the supply chain.

Calculating the construction costs for your project is not an easy task. Every year since 2009 we publish some guidelines and average prices to help you getting an approximate figure.

You can check our other articles in this series here.

Construction costs have continued to rise in 2020, but at a dramatically slower pace than in recent years. This is fuelled by the introduction of near zero energy buildings (NZEB) regulations, shortage of skilled trades, supply chain pressures, and additional costs associated with increased welfare/cleaning regimes on-site. 

Linesight’s reported that while COVID-19 has resulted in additional costs, it should be noted that the fall in construction output has potentially created
a more competitive tendering environment, putting downward pressure on contractor margins.

Linesight’s research indicates that the uplift in tender costs associated with COVID-19 has been more than offset by an increasingly competitive
tendering approach by contractors. This is due to concern around the impact of the current economic uncertainty on the quantum of work available for
tendering in the short to medium term, as reflected in the drop in construction output.

Linesight’s projection is that tender inflation for 2020 is likely to fall in the range of 3% to 3.5% (accounting for the impact of COVID).

The Society of Chartered Surveyors Ireland Tender Price index reveals that national construction tender prices increased by just 0.9% in the first half of 2020. The results indicate a continued slowing of Tender price growth in the construction sector.

Average Irish Construction Prices 2020

The table below shows the average construction costs as generated by Linesight’s Cost Database and sets out typical building construction costs:

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Average Irish Construction Costs 2020. Source: Linesight

Buildcost‘s construction cost guide also provides an overview of construction costs in Ireland in the second half of 2020:

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Construction cost guide 2020. Source: Buildcost

Buildcost‘s construction costs exclude FF&E, siteworks, VAT, professional fees, future inflation and other developer costs etc.

Labour Rates and Construction Materials Prices

The hourly rate pay has seen a 3% increase from last year.

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Hourly rate pay for workers in the construction sector. Source: Registered Agreement for the Construction Industry/Sectoral Employment Order 2020

 

The latest monthly data from CSO recorded that building and construction materials prices showed an increase of 0.4% in October 2020 since last year.

The most notable yearly changes were increases in cement (+5.1%), concrete products (+4.7%), Paints, oils and varnishes (+2.5%); while there were decreases in Bituminous emulsions (-10.3%), Glass (-5.2%), and Sand and gravel (-2.8%).

Guide to Rebuilding Costs in Ireland

The Society of Chartered Surveyors Ireland (SCSI) provides a House Rebuilding Cost Calculator here. This calculator can be used as a guide to give you a minimum base cost for your construction project.

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Table of Rebuilding Costs September 2019. Source: Society of Chartered Surveyors.

Typical Exclusions

There are a number of other expenses that you should also consider when estimating your project. See some of the exclusions that may apply to your project here.

Architect’s fees will vary based on a number of factors ranging from size and complexity to level of the service required. These two articles provide some guidelines:

Additionally, you may also need to allow for:

  • Design Certifier Fees
  • Assigned Certifier fees

Check out our other articles in this series

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Time to Design and Plan

This post is written as we experience the Great Lockdown – this is nothing ever experienced in the history of humanity as we try to stop the already 155,000 deaths worldwide caused by this new virus and disease.

Our kids have been out of school and locked at home for 5 weeks. We have been forced to work from home for the last 3 weeks. We have seen the full spectrum of emotions everywhere and anywhere. Life goes on slowly as we adapt to this new way of living.

The uncertainty is big and it is surrounded by many questions that do not have answers. Uncertainty is a difficult thing to bear. But let’s focus on things that are certain:

  • New treatments and potentially a vaccine for Covid-19 are quickly developing.
  • This storm will pass – we will get through this.

This is the time to PLAN.

It is in moments like these that the best ideas are born. We are working hard in all our projects that are not yet on site.

A big part of any construction project is spent in designing and planning for construction. The graphic below shows how designing and planning can easily take more than 50% of the overall time in a typical construction project.

Typical construction project life cycle IS: 15883
(Source: ‘A Handbook for Construction Project Planning and Scheduling’ by Virendra Kumar Paul, Chaitali Basu)

If you consider the time that it takes to actually start construction work on site, you may realise that the decision to start the project should not be postponed. Most Architect’s offices have their staff working from home and are available to assist and connect with you through a variety of different platforms.

This is the time to PLAN! Let’s get the ball rolling.

Get in touch with us by email at office@isabelbarrosarchitects.ie or phone 053 916 8942.

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All New Homes Will Be Nearly Zero Energy Buildings (NZEB)

Amendments to Part L of the Building Regulations (relating to the conservation of fuel and energy in dwellings) will come into effect on 01 November 2019.

All new homes will have a typical Building Energy Rating (BER) of A2 and will be 70% more energy efficient and emit 70% less carbon dioxide than 2005 performance levels.

What is a Nearly-Zero Energy Building (NZEB)?

‘Nearly zero-energy building’ means a building that has a very high energy performance. The nearly zero or very low amount of energy required should be covered to a very significant extent by energy from renewable sources, including energy from renewable sources produced on-site or nearby.

Are there any exceptions to the new regulations?

Yes, but only if planning approval or permission has been applied for on or before 31st October 2019 and substantial work has been completed by 31st October 2020.

“Substantial work has been completed” means that the structure of the external walls of the dwelling has been erected.

 What are the key changes to TGD L Dwellings 2019?

  • MPEPC (Maximum Permitted Energy Performance Coefficient)=0.30, in order to achieve the acceptable primary energy consumption rate.
  • MPCPC (Maximum Permitted Carbon Performance Coefficient)=0.35, to demonstrate that an acceptable CO2 emission rate has been achieved.
  • Where a dwelling undergoes major renovation, the energy performance of the whole dwelling should be improved to Cost Optimal level insofar as this is technically, functionally and economically feasible.
  • Introduction of a Renewable Energy Ratio (RER) of 20%.
  • Reduction of air permeability backstop from 7m3 /hr/m2 to 5m3 /hr/m2.
  • Table 1- Reduction of wall and floor backstop U-Value from 0.21W/m2K to 0.18 W/m2K.
  • Table 1- Reduction of window backstop U-Value from 1.6 W/m2K to 1.4 W/m2K.
  • Inclusion of guidance to avoid overheating in dwellings.
  • Par 1.3.2.4 – removal of variation of U-Value with percentage glazing.
  • Introduction of calculation of Ru value for corridors in apartments.

How can compliance be achieved?

The correct specifications need to be prepared by your Architect to your specific project. Compliance is then demonstrated using the DEAP (Dwelling Energy Assessment Procedure) software.

Below is an example prepared by the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government for a semi-detached dwelling with 126 sq.m. and with heat pump for space heating and continuous mechanical extract ventilation.

NZEB example specification
Semi-detached dwelling with 126 sq.m. and with heat pump for space heating and continuous mechanical extract ventilation

A nearly zero energy buildings (NZEB) future – Minister English reminds construction sector to be prepared for new building regulations on energy efficiency

What’s All the Fuss About the Revised Energy Performance of Buildings Directive

Overview of Key Changes to TGD L – Dwellings 2019

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